End Scene


There comes a time in everything’s lifespan where you have to evaluate where it’s at.  Even if it’s still enjoyable, it might not ultimately be worth continuing.  That said, I’ve decided to stop writing The Perfect Scene.

As you may know/have guessed, I’m not a full-time blogger.  (Few people are, of course.)  For the past 12 years I’ve worked in radio, but have needed a change for a while.  After weighing all options, I’ve decided to head back to school for web design.  Being a student and working part-time means I’ll have even less time for TPS, and really, I’d be lying if I said it weren’t already starting to feel like a bit of a chore.

The funny thing is, I almost doubled down on writing.  I do a bit of freelancing on the side, and plan to continue that.  Something under consideration was pursuing that full-time and residually putting more into blogging, but frankly I don’t get enough work at the moment.  My interest in websites actually grew in part from this site’s move from Blogger to WordPress.  Plus, let’s be honest: tech is a safer bet than journalism these days no?

Many blogs that start as hobbies aren’t updated every day.  But, TPS already averages only three or four posts a week.  I suppose it could go down to like one, but what’s the point?  I’m not one to let things just collect dust, so if you’re not getting a decent product to read it’s not really worth it.  It also became not just about stroking my own fandom when the submissions started coming in, so those artists, labels, PR boutiques and the like are also getting underserved in the process.

The general lack of time I’ve had for TPS is one thing, but there are certainly things I could’ve done better too.  Playing the social media game more, more promotion and even just setting and sticking to a schedule are absolutely areas that could’ve been improved upon.  These are lessons I’ll take with me for the future, although there are also things I stand by 100%.  A lack of recent growth indeed plays a role in deciding to end this blog, because plateauing is BLAH yo.

When The Perfect Scene debuted in 2014, I simply wanted to combine a love of music and writing.  The plan was to cover music in slightly unconventional fashion, and not just have generic music news.  It was not only about the heavyweights of alternative, but those local bands you discover on Twitter, etc. who are equally deserving of coverage.  It was about relating music to other things, combining interests for a different look.  I want to thank you and everyone who made any time for this little indie passion project – the regular readers, artists, labels, publicists and beyond (except those who SOLICITED coverage but still treated TPS as second-rate.  You can pound it ;)).  It really does mean the world to me, because there are tons of options out there and you don’t have to.  I had no real expectation, but this lil’ venture probably still did better than I thought it might.

It sucks that it’s come to this for The Perfect Scene, because I really do still enjoy writing it.  However, it’s better to burn out than fade away right?  This post won’t be the very last, because there are a couple planned for this week to really put a bow on things.  We’ll officially wrap it up next Sunday.

I’m not calling this development an indefinite hiatus, but I will use “inactive”.  Right now I can’t picture TPS’ return, but certainly if the stars align I’d be happy to revive it eventually.  We’ll have to see how it goes, but in the meantime, thank you.  We covered what we wanted the way we wanted, and that indeed makes a scene perfect.

(PS. Have you now clued into why yesterday’s “Weekendcore” was what it was?  FORESHADOWING LOLOLOL.  So…there’s that.)

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